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Epilepsy Center and Treatment

Epilepsy2019-01-23T02:30:50-04:00

The Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at CentraState— staffed by an experienced team of epileptologists, neurologists, registered nurses, and technologists—provides a full spectrum of care for adults, adolescents, and children with epilepsy. Using state-of-the-art, specialized equipment, we offer inpatient and outpatient diagnostic evaluations and procedures to diagnose and determine your best treatment option.

866-236-8727
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866-236-8727
REQUEST INFORMATION

The Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at CentraState— staffed by an experienced team of epileptologists, neurologists, registered nurses, and technologists—provides a full spectrum of care for adults, adolescents, and children with epilepsy. Using state-of-the-art, specialized equipment, we offer inpatient and outpatient diagnostic evaluations and procedures to diagnose and determine your best treatment option.

EPILEPSY SEIZURE CONTROL AND BEYOND

Video Electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring is the gold standard in evaluating patients with suspected seizures. This painless system records seizures on video and on a computer so that your physician can see what happens just before, during, and right after a seizure. This test can be very helpful in determining the specific area of your brain that the seizures originate from.

Video EEG may be used on a short-term or long-term basis. Short-term monitoring is done on an outpatient basis in the hospital and may last up to six hours. Long-term monitoring is done in the hospital and may last one to three or more days.

At CentraState, epilepsy treatment options include:

Seizure Medications—Medications can control seizures in most epilepsy patients. Your physician will choose a seizure medication based on the type of seizures you are having.

Dietary Therapy—Monitored by your physician and nutritionist, the ketogenic diet—a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet—can help control seizures in some people.

Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS)—This device, which is sometimes compared to a pacemaker, is designed to prevent seizures by sending regular, mild pulses of electrical energy to the brain via the vagus nerve.

Epilepsy Surgery—Surgery may be an option for some people whose seizures cannot be controlled by medications.

Chronic Disease Management—Manage underlying conditions such as genetically related conditions and developmental disorders that cause childhood epilepsy.

In addition to evaluating and treating patients with seizures or suspected seizures, we go beyond the goal of seizure control to address important issues, including:

  • Medical and non-medical treatment options
  • Behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures and medications
  • Pregnancy and reproductive issues in seizure patients
  • Everyday issues like driving and employment
  • Depression and other emotional health concerns of patients with seizures

Our multidisciplinary approach provides ongoing support for epilepsy patients and their families to improve quality of life, accessibility, and care for those coping with seizures.

PHYSICIANS

Vasko Gulevski, M.D. VG

Vasko Gulevski, M.D.

Neurology

Amos Katz, M.D.

Amos Katz, M.D.

MS Center, Neurology

Megdad Zaatreh, M.D.

Megdad Zaatreh, M.D.

Epileptologist, Neurology

Caren Marks, M.D. CM

Caren Marks, M.D.

MS Center, Neurology

Susan Lage, D.O. SL

Susan Lage, D.O.

Neurology

Maria Choy, M.D. MC

Maria Choy, M.D.

Neurology

Michael Moussouttas, MD MM

Michael Moussouttas, MD

Neurology

Terence McAlarney, M.D. TM

Terence McAlarney, M.D.

MS Center, Neurology

Jia Zhen Cheng, MD JC

Jia Zhen Cheng, MD

Neurology

Rajat Kumar, M.D. RK

Rajat Kumar, M.D.

Neurology

James Ware, M.D.

James Ware, M.D.

Neurology

Paul Kostoulakos, DO PK

Paul Kostoulakos, DO

Neurology

David Frank, M.D.

David Frank, M.D.

Neurology

Boris Furman, D.O. BF

Boris Furman, D.O.

Neurology

Arun Nangia, M.D. AN

Arun Nangia, M.D.

Neurology

Amor Mehta, MD

Amor Mehta, MD

Epileptologist, Neurology

FAQs

Epilepsy and seizures can happen at any age, but they often first appear during childhood. In fact, an estimated 50,000 new cases of pediatric epilepsy are diagnosed in children under age 18 each year in the U.S., according to the Epilepsy Foundation.

Because there are many types of epilepsy, seizures can appear in many different ways. The most common types of seizures include:

  • Simple, partial seizures, which cause symptoms such as sudden shifts in mood, unexplained anger or fear, disturbed speech, and “out of body” or other unusual feelings, such as things suddenly seeming unfamiliar.
  • Complex partial seizures, which cause symptoms like a lack of response or awareness to verbal stimuli, wandering, a lost sense of time, and repeating phrases or repeated lip smacking.
  • Generalized seizures, which are often the most obvious type of seizure, causing prolonged staring spells, sudden falls, muscle contractions, and convulsions.

If you experience any of these symptoms, seek prompt medical attention.

Children with epilepsy are prone to having multiple seizures over a period of months to years. Your doctor will first try to rule out non-epileptic causes of childhood seizures, such as those caused by fever (febrile seizures) or head trauma. Reports from parents or others who may have witnessed a seizure can also help doctors determine the cause of a seizure.

If further testing is needed, your doctor may order an EEG to check electrical activity in the brain. Brain scans such as specially designed MRIs may also help determine whether epilepsy is causing a child’s seizures.

More than half of pediatric epilepsy cases are idiopathic—meaning that doctors cannot identify a cause within the brain. Medication for seizures can often manage these types of epilepsy. In fact, about two-thirds of all children will outgrow the seizures caused by pediatric epilepsy by the time they are teens.

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