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Cardiology

Cardiology2019-04-30T13:48:48-04:00

At CentraState, we’re committed to helping people throughout the region keep their hearts healthy on many fronts. In addition to offering robust wellness and heart disease prevention programs, we provide advanced treatment for a wide range of heart conditions, from coronary heart disease to congestive heart failure. We also provide prompt emergency care and access to expert cardiologists and other physicians trained to safeguard healthy hearts.

732-294-2912
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732-294-2912
REQUEST INFORMATION

At CentraState, we’re committed to helping people throughout the region keep their hearts healthy on many fronts. In addition to offering robust wellness and heart disease prevention programs, we provide advanced treatment for a wide range of heart conditions, from coronary heart disease to congestive heart failure. We also provide prompt emergency care and access to expert cardiologists and other physicians trained to safeguard healthy hearts.

SERVICES

The Thomas J. Blanchet Cardiac Diagnostic Center at CentraState’s Star and Barry Tobias Ambulatory Campus offers comprehensive services using advanced technology to identify and evaluate heart conditions, and to monitor your progress following treatment for a heart-related condition. The center’s experienced staff is certified in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

View the different cardiac diagnostic tests available at CentraState Medical Center below.

Cardiology experts use many different diagnostic procedures—including cardiac catheterization—to determine if you may have heart disease or a heart problem.

Cardiac catheterization is a non-surgical, minimally invasive procedure that allows your cardiologist to take X-ray pictures of your heart to visually assess how well your heart is functioning. Usually performed as an outpatient procedure, it allows our cardiologists to view how your heart functions from the inside without the use of surgery.

Cardiac catheterization can be used to:

  • Detect the presence and severity of blockages in the arteries of the heart
  • Evaluate the pumping action in the chambers of the heart
  • Determine how well the heart valves are working
  • Uncover heart problems that may have been present since birth
  • Detect possible damage from previous heart attacks, infections, or trauma
  • Check on the results of cardiac bypass surgery
  • Assess heart function as it relates to surrounding tissues

Our Cardiac Catheterization Team

The cardiac catheterization team at CentraState Medical Center includes a cardiologist with specialized training in catheterization, a specially trained registered nurse, and an X-ray technologist skilled in cardiac studies.

Scheduling and Preparing for Cardiac Catheterization

Your cardiologist’s office will contact the Cardiac Catheterization Lab to schedule your test, including pre-admission testing, which may include blood work, an EKG, and X-rays.

You will be asked to call CentraState’s Centralized Scheduling department at 732-294-2778 on the day before your test to preregister. This ensures that important paperwork is prepared before you arrive for your test.

Your cardiac catheterization nurse calls you the night before your procedure to let you know what time to arrive at the Cardiac Catheterization Lab. The nurse explains the procedure and answers any questions you may have.

Please do not to eat for six hours before your test is scheduled.

Arriving for Your Cardiac Catheterization Test

On the day of your test, please bring a written list of your medications, including names, dosages and frequency. Please make arrangements for someone to bring you to and from your appointment (or use taxi/car service), as you will not be permitted to drive yourself home or to take public transportation.

The Cardiac Catheterization Lab is in the Donna O’Donnell, RN, Medical Arts Building adjacent to CentraState Medical Center. Take the elevator to the second floor and check in. When your scheduled appointment time arrives, you meet with a nurse to answer some questions. You then change into a hospital gown and your nurse begins an intravenous (IV) medication line. Next, you are transported to the Cardiac Catheterization Lab when the team is ready to perform your procedure.

How Cardiac Catheterization Is Performed

In the Cardiac Catheterization Lab, you are placed on cardiac monitors. You receive a local anesthetic at the site of catheterization and a mild sedative to help you relax. You remain awake during the procedure.

Your cardiologist threads a catheter—a thin, flexible tube—through a blood vessel in your wrist (radial artery) or groin (femoral artery), and carefully advances it into your heart and its arteries using X-ray guidance. Through the catheter, the physician can measure pressures and take blood samples.

A contrast dye is injected through the catheter into your heart’s blood vessels and chambers. The cardiologist can view the movement of the dye through your heart and coronary arteries to identify any areas of narrowing or blockage. This portion of the test is called coronary angiography. The cardiac catheterization team also performs a ventriculography, in which dye is injected into the heart’s pumping chambers to provide a view of the heart’s pumping action.

X-ray pictures are taken in the Control Room adjacent to the Cardiac Catheterization Lab during the procedure and recorded digitally. They are used to help make a diagnosis.

Recovery Following Cardiac Catheterization

If the catheter was inserted in your groin area, manual pressure will be applied to the insertion site for about 15 to 20 minutes to prevent bleeding and swelling after your procedure. If your doctor uses a vascular closure device to seal the catheter entry site, you most likely will not need the manual compression. If the wrist artery was used, a radial band is applied for compression.

During recovery, your vital signs and pulse are checked frequently. Fluids are provided to drink so that the contrast dye can be flushed out of your system. Your intravenous line remains in and your bandage is checked often.

When your physician determines that you are ready to go home, you receive written discharge instructions to ensure a safe and quick recovery.

Getting your Results

Your cardiologist is able to share some preliminary findings with you at the conclusion of your procedure. Final results are shared during your follow-up appointment.

Contact Us

For more information about CentraState’s Cardiac Catheterization Lab, please call 732-303-5174.

Preventing Heart Disease in Women

If you’re like many women, you may tend to put family and “to-do” lists before your own needs. But if you’re noticing any heart disease symptoms, it’s something that you should not put off.

Heart disease is the number one killer of women in America. That’s just one of the reasons why CentraState offers cardiac care designed especially for women, from prevention to treatment.

Located in our Star and Barry Tobias Ambulatory Campus, the Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program at Centrastate was created to identify women at risk for cardiovascular disease and help them modify preventable risk factors.
Developed and managed by women, the Women’s Heart Program offers comprehensive cardiac services from board-certified cardiologists and nurse practitioners who specialize in women’s heart health. We provide in-depth cardiac evaluations, individualized treatment plans, and assistance in preventing cardiovascular disease, including health, wellness, and fitness programs.

Risk Factors for Women

Pay attention to these heart disease risk factors in women:
  • Diabetes
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Strong family history of coronary artery disease
  • Hypertension, with a systolic blood pressure above 120
  • Body mass index higher than 25
  • Tobacco use
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • High cholesterol

Assessing your Risk for Heart Disease

At The Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program at CentraState, our board-certified cardiologists and cardiology nurse practitioners can help you assess your risk of heart disease and perform diagnostic evaluations.

Individualized Heart Disease Risk Assessment

The first step in identifying risk factors for heart disease is to conduct an individualized cardiac assessment. This will help us better understand your lifestyle habits and create an appropriate treatment plan.
Questions include:

  • Family health history
  • Physical activity level
  • Nutrition habits
  • Ability to handle stress
  • Tobacco and alcohol usage
  • Sleep habits

Diagnostic Evaluations for Heart Disease in Women

After reviewing your history and assessment results, the next step is a physical examination and screening tests. These may include:

  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol levels
  • Blood glucose testing
  • Weight/body mass index
  • Cardiac diagnostic tests

Based on your assessment and test results, we work closely with you and your primary care physician to develop a customized wellness plan that addresses any risk factors you may have.

Schedule an Appointment

You can be referred to The Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program at CentraState by your primary care physician, or request an appointment without a referral. We accept most insurances. To request an appointment, call 732-637-6366.
If you would like to make a gift to support the Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program, please click here.

Women’s Heart Program

At The Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program at CentraState, your cardiologist and nurse practitioner will guide you in making healthy lifestyle changes to help prevent or slow the progression of heart disease symptoms. Depending on your unique needs, we can help you with a healthy eating plan, smoking cessation advice, a weight management program, stress management techniques, a personalized exercise plan, or diabetes management.

Dietary Modifications and Weight Management

The Star and Barry Tobias Health Awareness Center helps people throughout our region adopt healthy lifestyles through our engaging wellness programs. As part of these offerings, our weight management and nutrition services include:

  • Nutrition counseling—A registered dietitian designs a personalized approach to healthy eating and weight management.
  • Healthy cooking demonstrations—These interactive sessions feature different themes and are held in a teaching kitchen.
  • Weight-loss programs—Group sessions taught by registered dietitians are custom-designed for those with cardiac risk factors.
  • Metabolic weight analysis—This includes computerized metabolic rate analysis and interpretation of results to help you achieve weight management goals.

Smoking Cessation Programs at CentraState

We know it can seem daunting to quit smoking—but our trained tobacco dependence counselors provide proven methods to help you achieve your smoke-free goal. A group setting offers mutual support, positive reinforcement, and encouragement. Learn more about our smoking cessation classes.

Physical Activity

CentraState’s Fitness and Wellness Center offers the latest strength and cardiovascular equipment, two pools, and more than 170 group exercise classes each week for all fitness levels and ages.

REHABILITATION PROGRAMS

cardiac rehab freehold njIf you have a cardiovascular condition or are recovering from a heart attack, a cardiac procedure, or cardiac surgery, the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at CentraState’s Star and Barry Tobias Ambulatory Campus can help. We offer a three-phase approach to improving your physical and emotional health.

CentraState’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program is certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). The program is led by a medical director who is a board-certified cardiologist. Our team also includes registered nurses with cardiac care experience and cardiac rehabilitation training who are certified by the American Heart Association in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

Our rehabilitation program includes:

Phase I: Education and Support

Phase I of cardiac rehabilitation, which begins in the hospital, provides education about risk factors, nutrition, medications, physical activity, and recovery from surgery. We help you understand how to live with or overcome your condition and how to prepare for life at home.

Phase II: Exercise Program

Phase II is an outpatient, monitored exercise program that meets one to three times a week and is tailored to fit your individual needs. Exercise becomes more vigorous as your function improves, which also helps you gain confidence. The program usually lasts up to three months and incorporates walking, weight training, and other supervised activity using equipment such as treadmills, stationary bikes, rowers, stair climbers, and arm ergometers. A physician referral is needed for participation.

Phase III: Follow-Up Program

Phase III allows you to continue a supervised exercise program if medically necessary, while also exercising at home. The program meets twice a week and may continue for up to 16 weeks. A physician referral is needed for participation.

Maintaining a Healthy Lifestyle

After completing the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, you can continue your commitment to health and well-being through our Fitness and Wellness Center’s Cardiac Wellness Program and Health Awareness Center offerings—all conveniently located at CentraState’s Star and Barry Tobias Ambulatory Campus.

Contact Us

For more information about CentraState’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, please call 732-294-2918.

balance and dizziness program freehold njCentraState provides a Supervised Exercise Therapy Program designed to aid those with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), including discomfort in the legs and restricted blood flow to the kidneys, stomach, arms, legs, and feet.

The customized program involves walking on a treadmill at a certain incline and speed until you develop mild discomfort, then taking a break until symptoms subside, then restarting. The exercise is completed under the supervision of a cardiac rehabilitation nurse and is designed to build endurance, alleviate the symptoms of PAD, and possibly prevent the need for surgery.

The program is three times a week for 12 weeks, and participants usually advance from being able to perform 15 to 30 minutes of exercise to 50 to 60 minutes of exercise per day, including warm-up and cool-down time. Once the on-site program concludes, patients are encouraged to exercise on their own at home or a medically-supervised fitness center such as CentraState Fitness and Wellness Center.

The benefits of PAD Rehab include:

  • Improved exercise tolerance
  • More stamina
  • Better quality of life
  • Reduced probability of having a cardiac event
  • Increased circulation

Is Supervised Exercise Therapy (SET) Right for Me?

Supervised exercise therapy is a promising, non-surgical weapon to treat PAD. Patients who have experienced heart attacks or have had open-heart surgery have been referred to supervised exercise therapy programs for many years and have made great strides in regaining their exercise stamina. Because peripheral artery disease often makes exercise painful, this is a new approach, and while exercise may be uncomfortable at first, the benefits greatly outweigh the initial discomfort.

 

First, you’ll need a formal diagnosis of peripheral artery disease from a referring physician, followed by a prescription. Diagnostic tests for PAD include an ankle-brachial index (ABI) test, which compares the blood pressure in your foot with the blood pressure in your arm; ultrasound, MRI or CT scan of legs; or an arteriogram, which provides a “road map” of your arteries, locating any blockages.

After diagnosis, if your doctor says you are able to exercise and that it’s safe for you to do so, you may begin. The program is covered by Medicare. To determine if other insurance coverage is available, patients can contact their insurance companies for individual policy and plan details.

For more information about CentraState’s PAD exercise program, call 866-CENTRA7 (866-236-8727).

TESTS AND DIAGNOSTICS

24-HOUR HOLTER MONITER TEST

A 24-hour Holter monitor test can help identify an irregular heartbeat or palpitations. This test is an EKG (electrocardiogram) taken for a 24-hour period. During this time, you are able to go about most of your daily activities at home.

Scheduling an Appointment

A Holter monitor test requires a prescription. To schedule a 24-hour Holter monitor test, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778.

FAQs

To set up the test, five electrode patches are placed in different locations on your chest. A cable connects the electrodes to a portable electrocardiographic device (the Holter monitor), which records the electrical activity of your heart continually over the next 24 hours, while you go about your normal activities. The Holter monitor can be worn over your shoulder or attached to a belt around your waist.

During the test period, you also keep a detailed diary recording the time and circumstances of any heart-related symptoms, such as chest pain, dizziness, shortness of breath, or heart palpitations. After the test period, you return to the Cardiology Services Department to have the monitor removed and turn in your diary.

The Holter monitor recording is then analyzed and the doctor compares it with your diary to identify any correlation between abnormal recordings and your activities or symptoms.

Do not take a bath or shower. You may wash as long as the recorder does not get wet. Do not use an electric blanket while wearing the recorder. If you are allergic to any tape, alert the technician before the electrodes are placed on your chest.
The recording will be scanned the day you bring it back. Your physician will receive the results in one to three days. Please be sure that we have your doctor’s address before you leave. You may resume all daily activities after the monitor is removed.

AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORING

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is used to evaluate how your blood pressure responds to activities in your daily life. It can be used to help detect any blood pressure abnormalities.

This type of monitoring takes numerous readings of your blood pressure over a 24-hour period or longer. The monitor is a small device worn in a pouch that has a blood pressure cuff attached to it. The cuff is fitted onto your arm and inflates and deflates automatically while it is worn. It can provide a better picture of your blood pressure than occasional readings taken at your doctor’s office.

Scheduling an Appointment

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring requires a prescription. To schedule ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778.

ECHOCARDIOGRAM

The echocardiogram, also called “echo,” is a painless test that is used to track the heart’s movements or diagnose certain heart abnormalities. It operates like the sonar used by whales and submarines to locate objects under water. During the test, sound waves generated by small devices called transducers bounce off heart structures and beam back to a screen where they are recorded.

Echocardiogram with Contrast

Your physician may order the use of an imaging agent to enhance certain parts of the echocardiogram test, which is called echocardiogram with contrast. This involves the insertion of a small intravenous catheter and the imaging agent by a registered nurse. Please let the scheduler know if your physician has indicated this on your prescription when you call to register.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is required for an echocardiogram. To schedule an echocardiogram, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778 or request an appointment online.

FAQs

No special preparations are necessary. For best results, wear clothing that allows easy access to the chest area and try to arrive at the test relaxed.
During the test, you are asked to remove clothing above the waist or anything covering the left side of the chest. A hospital gown and a towel to cover the chest area will be provided. A specially trained technician will hold the echo transducer with firm pressure in various places across the chest. You may be asked to lie in different positions while information is gathered and recorded.
The test typically takes less than 45 minutes. You may resume normal activity after the test, according to your doctor’s instructions.
A CentraState cardiologist will evaluate the findings and prepare a report that is sent to your physician in one to two days. Your physician will explain the results to you and recommend additional tests or treatment, if necessary.

EKG (ELECTROCARDIOGRAM)

An EKG (electrocardiogram) is a painless test that records the electrical activity of your heart. The electrical activity is what causes your heart to contract. An EKG helps assess the health of your heart muscle and is used in conjunction with other cardiac diagnostic tests. It takes about 15 minutes.

No appointment is necessary for an EKG, but a prescription from your physician is needed. Simply visit Outpatient Registration prior to testing. Hours are Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.

After your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, they will be sent to your physician or primary care provider within one to two days.

EXERCISE STRESS TEST

An exercise stress test measures your heart’s health during physical activity. It involves walking on a treadmill under the supervision of a physician while your heart is monitored. This test helps determine:

  • Underlying heart conditions
  • Your fitness level
  • A safe exercise program for you

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is needed for an exercise stress test. To schedule an exercise stress test, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778 or request an appointment online.

FAQs

Although your doctor will provide specific instructions, the basic guidelines are:

  • Do not eat for 2 hours before the test
  • Wear loose-fitting, comfortable walking clothing
  • Wear flat, rubber-soled shoes or sneakers
  • Women should wear a non-underwire bra
  • You may also need to avoid certain medications before the test. Please check with your doctor.

The test usually takes 30 to 40 minutes. Plan to arrive 15 minutes early to allow for check-in with the Outpatient Department.

It can often detect heart disorders missed by an EKG (which is performed while you are at rest). Because the heart beats faster and the body needs more oxygen while exercising, an exercise stress test can provide more specific information about the functioning of the heart muscle and arteries.

During the test, a specially trained technician or nurse places electrodes on your chest. The cables or “leads” from the electrodes are connected to an electrocardiograph recorder. You then step on a treadmill or stationary bike and exercise according to the doctor’s instructions. The technician takes an EKG every minute and monitors your blood pressure and pulse during the exercise.

A physician is present at all times during the test. If you have any symptoms, you will alert the physician or technician.

Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days. Your doctor will explain the results, talk with you about an exercise program, and, if necessary, suggest further testing or treatment.

IMPEDANCE CARDIOGRAPHY

Impedance Cardiography (ICG) is a non-invasive technique to measure and monitor blood circulation. The method is based on changes in the electrical resistance of the chest during the heartbeat, which is captured through electrodes placed on your neck and chest.

An ICG provides information about the circulatory system that is helpful in diagnosing the cause of complaints such as shortness of breath. It also is used in programming atrioventricular and CRT pacemakers.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is needed from a physician for this test. To schedule an impedance cardiogram, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778.

NUCLEAR STRESS TEST

A nuclear stress test is similar to an exercise stress test in that you exercise on a treadmill while your heart is monitored. However, a nuclear stress test also uses thallium or another tracing substance to provide more information about blood flow to your heart.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is needed for this test. To schedule a nuclear stress test, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778 or request an appointment online.

FAQs

Although your doctor will provide specific instructions, the basic guidelines are:

  • Do not eat for 8 hours before the test
  • Wear loose-fitting, comfortable walking clothing
  • Wear flat, rubber-soled shoes or sneakers
  • Women should wear a non-underwire bra
  • You may also need to avoid certain medications before the test. Please check with your doctor.
You receive an injection of a small amount of a nuclear isotope before and during the test. A rotating camera above you takes pictures of your heart following the injections, both at rest and after you exercise. This way, the cardiologist can visualize the blood supply to your heart before and after the stress test. A physician is present throughout the course of exercise.
Plan to be at the hospital for about 3 to 4 hours for a nuclear stress test.

Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days. Your doctor will explain the results, talk with you about an exercise program, and, if necessary, suggest further testing or treatment.

PACEMAKER EVALUATION

If you have a pacemaker, this simple, 10-minute procedure periodically checks its functioning. In this test, a sensor is placed on your chest area near the pacemaker pocket. Information about the pacemaker is then recorded using a special magnet.

Pacemaker evaluation can be done at CentraState or from your home in some cases, depending on the type and age of the pacemaker. Pacemaker insertion is also offered at CentraState through our Surgical Services department.

Scheduling an Appointment

To schedule a pacemaker evaluation, please call Cardiac Services at 732- 294-2912.

FAQs

Your pacemaker must be checked regularly after it is implanted or your generator is replaced. As a general guideline, get your pacemaker checked every month for the first three months you have it, and then every three months until replacement or a change in heart rate.

Your physician may also determine when your pacemaker should be evaluated or reprogrammed.

PHARMACOLOGICAL NUCLEAR STRESS TEST

Sometimes called a non-stress test, a pharmacological nuclear stress test evaluates blood flow to the heart by using a tracing substance instead of exercise.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is necessary for this test. To schedule a pharmacological nuclear stress test, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778.

FAQs

You should avoid eating for four hours before the test. Your doctor will instruct you about certain medications to avoid.
Throughout the test and for a period of time after it, an EKG (electrocardiogram) is taken. A medication that simulates the effects of stress (or exercise) on the heart is given to you through an IV (intravenously), along with nuclear isotopes in order to make it possible to image the heart muscle. A rotating camera above you takes two sets of images—one at rest before the medication is administered and one after the medication is administered. Each set of images takes about 15 minutes. A physician and nurse will be present during the stress portion of the test.
Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days. Your doctor will explain the results, talk with you about an exercise program, and, if necessary, suggest further testing or treatment.

STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAM

A stress echocardiogram (stress echo) combines exercise, stress testing, and cardiac ultrasound to look for evidence of ischemic heart disease (narrowed arteries) and monitor blood flow in the heart.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is needed for a stress echocardiogram. To make an appointment, please call Cardiology Services at 732-294-2912.

FAQs

Although your doctor will provide specific instructions, the basic guidelines are:

  • Do not eat for 2 hours before the test
  • Wear loose-fitting, comfortable walking clothing
  • Wear flat, rubber-soled shoes or sneakers
  • Women should wear a non-underwire bra
  • You may also need to avoid certain medications before the test. Please check with your doctor.
You may walk on a treadmill, pedal a bike, or receive intravenous medicine if you are unable to exercise. An echocardiogram will be done before and immediately after exercise or medication.

Plan to be at the hospital for about 1 to 2 hours for a stress echocardiogram.

TRANSESOPHAGEAL ECHOCARDIOGRAM (TEE)

A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is an invasive diagnostic procedure used to detect abnormalities in the internal structure of the heart muscle.

Scheduling an Appointment

A prescription is needed for a transesophageal echocardiogram. To schedule an appointment, please call Centralized Scheduling at 732-294-2778.

FAQs

You should avoid taking anything by mouth for 6 to 8 hours before the test. If you have dentures, please remove them. There is a short recovery period after the test. If you are taking the test as an outpatient, you must arrange for someone to drive you home.
First, an IV is started so you can receive a sedative to promote restfulness and prevent discomfort, and you are connected to an EKG monitor. During the test, an ultrasound transducer is passed through your mouth and down the esophagus to view the heart muscle. A cardiologist or nurse, and a cardiac ultrasound technician, are present throughout the procedure.

Whether you’ve just been diagnosed with high blood pressure, or you’ve been struggling to control it, CentraState’s free six-week hypertension management program can help.

PHYSICIANS

Scott Eisenberg, D.O.

Scott Eisenberg, D.O.

Cardiology

Jatinchandra Patel, D.O.

Jatinchandra Patel, D.O.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

John Werber, M.D. JW

John Werber, M.D.

Cardiology

Ashish Shukla, M.D. AS

Ashish Shukla, M.D.

Cardiology

Riple Hansalia, M.D. RH

Riple Hansalia, M.D.

Cardiology

Ashish Awasthi, M.D.

Ashish Awasthi, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

Arthur Okere, M.D. AO

Arthur Okere, M.D.

Cardiology

Edmund Karam, M.D. EK

Edmund Karam, M.D.

Cardiology

Sangeeta Garg, M.D.

Sangeeta Garg, M.D.

Cardiology

Iris Mentle, M.D. IM

Iris Mentle, M.D.

Cardiology

Robert Kayser, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

Robert Kayser, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

Peter Hynes, M. D. PH

Peter Hynes, M. D.

Cardiology

John Covalesky, D.O.

John Covalesky, D.O.

Cardiology

Ted Gutowski, M.D.

Ted Gutowski, M.D.

Cardiology

Maurice Weiss, M.D. MW

Maurice Weiss, M.D.

Cardiology

Divya Menon, M. D. DM

Divya Menon, M. D.

Cardiology

Aaron Van Hise, D.O.

Aaron Van Hise, D.O.

Cardiology

David Pinnelas, M.D. DP

David Pinnelas, M.D.

Cardiology

Leonard Sandler, M.D. LS

Leonard Sandler, M.D.

Cardiology

Rayson Yang, M.D. RY

Rayson Yang, M.D.

Cardiology

Jasrai Gill, M.D. JG

Jasrai Gill, M.D.

Cardiology

Charles Mattina, M.D.

Charles Mattina, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Jason Litsky, D.O. JL

Jason Litsky, D.O.

Cardiology

Loyda Rivera, M.D. LR

Loyda Rivera, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Charles Koo, M.D. CK

Charles Koo, M.D.

Cardiology

Brett Sealove, M.D. BS

Brett Sealove, M.D.

Cardiology

Marcia Liu, M.D.

Marcia Liu, M.D.

Cardiology

Ashish Patel, M.D. AP

Ashish Patel, M.D.

Cardiology

Elsa Castro, M.D. EC

Elsa Castro, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Nelson LaMarche, M.D., FACC

Nelson LaMarche, M.D., FACC

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Renato Apolito, M.D.

Renato Apolito, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

Leon O'Neill, DO LO

Leon O'Neill, DO

Cardiology

Gregory Noto, M.D., FACC

Gregory Noto, M.D., FACC

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Stephanie Chin, M.D. SC

Stephanie Chin, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Thomas Rizzo, M.D., FACC TR

Thomas Rizzo, M.D., FACC

Cardiology

Matthew Saybolt, M.D. MS

Matthew Saybolt, M.D.

Cardiology

Alpesh Patel, M.D.

Alpesh Patel, M.D.

Cardiology

Lance Berger, M.D.

Lance Berger, M.D.

Cardiology

L. Steven Zukerman, M.D. FACC LZ

L. Steven Zukerman, M.D. FACC

Cardiology

Mitchel Alpert, M.D. MA

Mitchel Alpert, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Mark Mascarenhas, M.D. MM

Mark Mascarenhas, M.D.

Cardiology

Bharath Sathya, M.D. BS

Bharath Sathya, M.D.

Cardiology

Matt Bach, M.D., FACC MB

Matt Bach, M.D., FACC

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Aarti Patel, M.D.

Aarti Patel, M.D.

Cardiology

Mahim Kapoor, M.D. MK

Mahim Kapoor, M.D.

Cardiology

John Checton, M.D. JC

John Checton, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Jeffrey Osofsky, M.D. JO

Jeffrey Osofsky, M.D.

Cardiology

Maria Umali, M.D. MU

Maria Umali, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Vincent Zales, M.D. VZ

Vincent Zales, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Jeffrey Daniels, M.D. JD

Jeffrey Daniels, M.D.

Cardiology

Steven Daniels, M.D., FACC

Steven Daniels, M.D., FACC

Cardiology

Sadaf Khan, M.D. SK

Sadaf Khan, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Michael Macciocca, MD MM

Michael Macciocca, MD

Cardiology

Bart G
Bart G

Long-Time First Responder Marks Another First Bart Amburgey, an 87-year-old lifelong resident of New Egypt, is considered by many as a legend in his hometown. Earning the nickname “Father Bart” for his reputation as a role model and storyteller, he has volunteered in his community throughout his life—including 47 [...]

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Larry D.
Larry D.

Larry Donsky is known for cracking jokes and making people laugh, but when he suffered a heart attack last June, he got serious about his health with cardiac rehabilitation. Active in the men’s club of his adult community and the local Italian-American club, the 77-year-old Jackson resident regularly booked [...]

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Louise C.
Louise C.

Feeling in the peak of health, 65-year-old Louise Cassar of Jackson visited her primary care physician in early February 2013 for her annual physical exam. To her surprise, the electrocardiogram (EKG), a routine part of the exam, revealed a slight abnormality. Despite Louise having had no symptoms that would [...]

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Million Hearts Program Puts Cardiac Health into Focus

Last year, Family Practice of CentraState and several other CentraState physician practices were selected to participate in the Million Hearts® Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Model program, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ five-year initiative to reduce heart attack and stroke risk. Since then, participating patients have reduced their [...]

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A Woman’s Heart Attack: Subtle Symptoms You Need to Know!

An estimated 44 million women in the U.S. are affected by cardiovascular diseases. Enhance your well-being and heart health by learning these subtle symptoms that can signal something isn’t right. Increased pressure in the chest or heartburn (While both men and women can feel like there’s an elephant on [...]

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The Link Between Migraines and Women’s Heart Disease

By James Ware, MD The agony of a migraine headache is debilitating on its own, but can it also be the sign of something more dangerous? Recent studies have found that the risk of heart disease and stroke are increased in women who suffer from migraines. While the [...]

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