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Cardiology

Cardiology2022-11-18T09:02:37-05:00

At CentraState, we’re committed to helping people throughout the region keep their hearts healthy on many fronts. CentraState provides best-in-class diagnostic and interventional procedures in a new state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization lab, robust prevention programs, Chest Pain Accredited emergency care and access to board-certified general and interventional cardiologists and other clinical experts trained to safeguard healthy hearts.

732-294-2912
REQUEST INFORMATION
732-294-2912
REQUEST INFORMATION

At CentraState, we’re committed to helping people throughout the region keep their hearts healthy on many fronts. CentraState provides best-in-class diagnostic and interventional procedures in a new state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization lab, robust prevention programs, Chest Pain Accredited emergency care and access to board-certified general and interventional cardiologists and other clinical experts trained to safeguard healthy hearts.

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

CentraState’s interventional cardiologists diagnose and treat patients who may need minimally invasive catheter-based interventions for heart disease and heart-related illnesses. Using high-tech imaging and other diagnostic techniques, interventional cardiologists evaluate blood flow and pressure in the coronary arteries and chambers of the heart and treat such conditions like heart valve disorder, congenital heart disease, vascular disease, acquired structural heart disease, and other cardiovascular abnormalities. An interventional cardiologist is highly specialized and skilled in the prevention of heart disease, as well as complications that can arise such as stroke and heart failure.

CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION LABORATORY

The Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at CentraState Medical Center provides full-service diagnostic capability to quickly and accurately diagnose heart problems such as structural issues, weakened heart muscle, and narrow or blocked blood vessels. This nonsurgical, minimally invasive procedure provides a more complete picture of heart and blood vessel anatomy than imaging alone.

CentraState’s cardiac catheterization team includes board-certified, highly experienced interventional cardiologists. Supporting members of the team include specially trained nurses and radiologic technologists with extensive cardiac catheterization lab experience. Together, the team offers broad cardiac knowledge—including critical care and emergency department experience—paired with a personal, supportive approach to care.

CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION Q&A

Cardiac catheterization is a nonsurgical, minimally invasive procedure that allows your cardiologist to take X-ray pictures of your heart to visually assess how well your heart is functioning. Usually performed as an outpatient procedure, it allows our cardiologists to view how your heart functions from the inside without the use of surgery.

Your cardiologist’s office will contact the Cardiac Catheterization Lab to schedule your test, including pre-admission testing, which may include blood work, an EKG, and X-rays. You will be asked to call CentraState’s Centralized Scheduling department at 732-294-2778 on the day before your test to preregister. This ensures that important paperwork is prepared before you arrive for your test.

In the Cardiac Catheterization Lab, you are placed on cardiac monitors. You receive a local anesthetic at the site of catheterization and a mild sedative to help you relax. You remain awake during the procedure.

Your cardiologist will thread a catheter—a thin, flexible tube—through a blood vessel in your wrist (radial artery) or groin (femoral artery). The physician carefully advances the catheter into your heart and its arteries using X-ray guidance. Through the catheter, the physician can measure pressures and take blood samples.

The cardiologist injects a contrast dye through the catheter into the heart’s blood vessels and chambers. The cardiologist can view the movement of the dye through your heart and coronary arteries to identify any areas of narrowing or blockage. This portion of the test is called coronary angiography.

The cardiac catheterization team also performs a ventriculography, in which dye is injected into the heart’s pumping chambers to provide a view of the heart’s pumping action.

CARDIAC DIAGNOSTICS

The Thomas J. Blanchet Cardiac Diagnostic Center offers comprehensive services using advanced technology to identify and evaluate heart conditions, and to monitor your progress following treatment for a heart-related condition, including:

To schedule a diagnostic procedure, please call Central Scheduling at 732-294-2778. To schedule a stress echocardiogram or a pacemaker evaluation, please call 732-294-2912.

CARDIAC REHABILITATION AND WELLNESS PROGRAMS

CARDIAC DIAGNOSTICS Q&A

A 24-hour Holter monitor test can help identify an irregular heartbeat or palpitations. This test is an EKG (electrocardiogram) taken for a 24-hour period. During this time, you are able to go about most of your daily activities at home. A Holter monitor test requires a prescription.

Impedance Cardiography (ICG) is a non-invasive technique to measure and monitor blood circulation. The method is based on changes in the electrical resistance of the chest during the heartbeat, which is captured through electrodes placed on your neck and chest.

An ICG provides information about the circulatory system that is helpful in diagnosing the cause of complaints such as shortness of breath. It also is used in programming atrioventricular and CRT pacemakers.

If you have a pacemaker, this simple, 10-minute procedure periodically checks its functioning. As a general guideline, you should get your pacemaker checked every month for the first three months you have it, and then every three months until replacement or a change in heart rate.

In this test, a sensor is placed on your chest area near the pacemaker pocket. Information about the pacemaker is then recorded using a special magnet.

Pacemaker evaluation can be done at CentraState or from your home in some cases, depending on the type and age of the pacemaker. To schedule a pacemaker evaluation, please call Cardiac Services at 732-294-2912.

An electrocardiogram or EKG is a painless test that records the electrical activity of your heart. The electrical activity is what causes your heart to contract. An EKG helps assess the health of your heart muscle and is used in conjunction with other cardiac diagnostic tests. It takes about 15 minutes. No appointment is needed.

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is used to evaluate how your blood pressure responds to activities in your daily life. It can be used to help detect any blood pressure abnormalities.

This type of monitoring, which requires a prescription, takes numerous readings of your blood pressure over a 24-hour period or longer. The monitor is a small device worn in a pouch that has a blood pressure cuff attached to it. The cuff is fitted onto your arm and inflates and deflates automatically while it is worn.

STRESS TESTS Q&A

An exercise stress test measures your heart’s health during physical activity. It involves walking on a treadmill under the supervision of a physician while your heart is monitored. The test usually takes 30 to 40 minutes. This test helps determine: underlying heart conditions, your fitness level, a safe exercise program for you.

This test can often detect heart disorders missed by an EKG (which is performed while you are at rest). Because the heart beats faster and the body needs more oxygen while exercising, an exercise stress test can provide more specific information about the functioning of the heart muscle and arteries.

During the test, a specially trained technician or nurse places electrodes on your chest. The cables or “leads” from the electrodes are connected to an electrocardiograph recorder. You then step on a treadmill or stationary bike and exercise according to the doctor’s instructions. The technician takes an EKG every minute and monitors your blood pressure and pulse during the exercise. Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days.

A nuclear stress test is similar to an exercise stress test in that you exercise on a treadmill while your heart is monitored. However, a nuclear stress test also uses thallium or another tracing substance to provide more information about blood flow to your heart. The test will take about 3 to 4 hours.

During a nuclear stress test you receive an injection of a small amount of a nuclear isotope before and during the test. A rotating camera above you takes pictures of your heart following the injections, both at rest and after you exercise. This way, the cardiologist can visualize the blood supply to your heart before and after the stress test. A physician is present throughout the course of exercise. Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days.

Sometimes called a non-stress test, a pharmacological nuclear stress test evaluates blood flow to the heart by using a tracing substance instead of exercise. You should avoid eating for four hours before the test. Your doctor will instruct you about certain medications to avoid.

Throughout the test and for a period of time after it, an EKG (electrocardiogram) is taken. A medication that simulates the effects of stress (or exercise) on the heart is given to you through an IV (intravenously), along with nuclear isotopes in order to make it possible to image the heart muscle. A rotating camera above you takes two sets of images—one at rest before the medication is administered and one after the medication is administered. Each set of images takes about 15 minutes. A physician and nurse will be present during the stress portion of the test. Your results are interpreted by a cardiologist, and your physician or primary care provider will receive them within one to two days.

An echocardiogram, also called “echo,” is a painless test that is used to track the heart’s movements or diagnose certain heart abnormalities. During the test, sound waves generated by small devices called transducers bounce off heart structures and beam back to a screen where they are recorded. The test typically takes less than 45 minutes.

During the test, you are asked to remove clothing above the waist or anything covering the left side of the chest. A hospital gown and a towel to cover the chest area will be provided. A specially trained technician will hold the echo transducer with firm pressure in various places across the chest. You may be asked to lie in different positions while information is gathered and recorded. A CentraState cardiologist will evaluate the findings and prepare a report that is sent to your physician in one to two days. Your physician will explain the results to you and recommend additional tests or treatment, if necessary.

Your physician may order the use of an imaging agent to enhance certain parts of the echocardiogram test, which is called echocardiogram with contrast. This involves the insertion of a small intravenous catheter and the imaging agent by a registered nurse.

A stress echocardiogram combines exercise, stress testing, and cardiac ultrasound to look for evidence of ischemic heart disease (narrowed arteries) and monitor blood flow in the heart. The test takes about 1 to 2 hours.

You may walk on a treadmill, pedal a bike, or receive intravenous medicine if you are unable to exercise. An echocardiogram will be done before and immediately after exercise or medication. Your doctor will provide specific instructions on how to prepare. To schedule a stress echocardiogram, please call 732-294-2912.

A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is an invasive diagnostic procedure used to detect abnormalities in the internal structure of the heart muscle.

During the TEE, an IV is started so you can receive a sedative to promote restfulness and prevent discomfort, and you are connected to an EKG monitor. During the test, an ultrasound transducer is passed through your mouth and down the esophagus to view the heart muscle. A cardiologist or nurse, and a cardiac ultrasound technician, are present throughout the procedure.

FIND A CARDIOLOGIST

Rayson Yang, M.D. RY

Rayson Yang, M.D.

Cardiology

Lance Berger, M.D.

Lance Berger, M.D.

Cardiology

Divya Menon, M. D. DM

Divya Menon, M. D.

Cardiology

Jatinchandra Patel, D.O.

Jatinchandra Patel, D.O.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

David Pinnelas, M.D. DP

David Pinnelas, M.D.

Cardiology

Iris Mentle, M.D. IM

Iris Mentle, M.D.

Cardiology

Sangeeta Garg, M.D.

Sangeeta Garg, M.D.

Cardiology

Ted Gutowski, M.D.

Ted Gutowski, M.D.

Cardiology

Peter Farrugia, M.D. PF

Peter Farrugia, M.D.

Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology

John Werber, M.D. JW

John Werber, M.D.

Cardiology

Gregory Noto, M.D., FACC

Gregory Noto, M.D., FACC

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology

Maurice Weiss, M.D. MW

Maurice Weiss, M.D.

Cardiology

Riple Hansalia, M.D. RH

Riple Hansalia, M.D.

Cardiology

Ashish Shukla, M.D. AS

Ashish Shukla, M.D.

Cardiology

Aaron Van Hise, D.O. AV

Aaron Van Hise, D.O.

Cardiology

Arthur Okere, M.D. AO

Arthur Okere, M.D.

Cardiology

Edmund Karam, M.D. EK

Edmund Karam, M.D.

Cardiology

Ashish Awasthi, M.D.

Ashish Awasthi, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

John Covalesky, D.O.

John Covalesky, D.O.

Cardiology

Robert Kayser, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

Robert Kayser, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

Leonard Sandler, M.D. LS

Leonard Sandler, M.D.

Cardiology

Peter Hynes, M. D. PH

Peter Hynes, M. D.

Cardiology

Vincent Zales, M.D. VZ

Vincent Zales, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Matthew Schoenfeld, MD MS

Matthew Schoenfeld, MD

Cardiology, Echocardiography, Nuclear Cardiology

Michael Macciocca, MD MM

Michael Macciocca, MD

Cardiology

Chase  Contino, M.D. CC

Chase Contino, M.D.

Cardiology, Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology

Loyda Rivera, M.D. LR

Loyda Rivera, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Mitchel Alpert, M.D. MA

Mitchel Alpert, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Sadaf Khan, M.D. SK

Sadaf Khan, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Aarti Patel, M.D.

Aarti Patel, M.D.

Cardiology

Stephanie Chin, M.D. SC

Stephanie Chin, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Jasrai Gill, M.D. JG

Jasrai Gill, M.D.

Cardiology

Renato Apolito, M.D.

Renato Apolito, M.D.

Cardiac Catheterization, Cardiology, Endovascular Intervention

Maria Umali, M.D. MU

Maria Umali, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Elsa Castro, M.D. EC

Elsa Castro, M.D.

Pediatric Cardiology

Mildred G.
Mildred G.
Mildred G.
When Mildred Grace, 72, had an EKG as a safeguard before a scheduled surgery, it signaled that she may have a cardiac issue. At the advice of a friend, she contacted the Gloria Saker Women’s Heart Program at CentraState—where she learned that despite not having any symptoms, she had three health conditions that put her at risk for a serious...Read More >
Bart G
Bart G
Bart G
Long-Time First Responder Marks Another First Bart Amburgey, an 87-year-old lifelong resident of New Egypt, is considered by many as a legend in his hometown. Earning the nickname “Father Bart” for his reputation as a role model and storyteller, he has volunteered in his community throughout his life—including 47 years with the first aid squad and 50 years with the...Read More >
Larry D.
Larry D.
Larry D.
Larry Donsky is known for cracking jokes and making people laugh, but when he suffered a heart attack last June, he got serious about his health with cardiac rehabilitation. Active in the men’s club of his adult community and the local Italian-American club, the 77-year-old Jackson resident regularly booked entertainers for club events. During one event, he was asked to...Read More >

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